Lamb-Shank

Eat whole for 30 days

Early next month, Paleo Cafe Townsville kicks off with its first ever Whole30 program. The only Paleo Cafe in Australia to pioneer this 30-day nutrition challenge; it’s all about ditching the processed foods, alcohol, sugar, grains and dairy to feel better from the inside out.

TheGo chatted to Paleo Cafe Townsville’s Tara Caetano, who is also a health and lifestyle coach and food blogger, to get the run down on this strict, but potentially life-changing program.

“It’s a chance to see how your body functions without those extra items in your diet and how it works at its best” – Tara Caetano

Whole30What is Whole30 in a nutshell? It’s all about giving your body a restart. Certain foods can put stress on the body, so by giving your digestive system a break it allows us to recalibrate. Some of us are getting to the stage where bad habits are making their way into our everyday eating and effecting our health; so it’s a great way to get rid of those and start again.

How will the program work? We are supplying participants’ lunches and dinners for 30 days. They’ll come to collect the pre-made meals twice a week – Tuesdays and Fridays – all they need to do is heat, eat and enjoy the food — all the guesswork is taken out. Plus, by having quick and convenient ready-made meals, there’s much more time to focus on the other areas of your life.

What are some of the benefits people can expect to see? Improved energy, better skin, the reduction of persistent (non exercise or injury-related) aches and pains are just some of the benefits; plus weight loss, but that’s really a side consequence [while you can weigh yourself before and after, you're not allowed to step on the scales or take any body measurements for the duration of Whole30 because it detracts from the true focus].

What will be the biggest hurdle for Whole30ers? Giving up sugar, because — even if you don’t have a ‘sweet tooth’ — it’s present in so many of the foods we eat. For example, some sauces can be up to 50% sugar. It can be intimidating at first, but it’s best to focus on the things you can have, rather than the things you can’t, like meat, seafood, plenty of fruit and veg, eggs, nuts and seeds — basically nourishing foods that leave you feeling satisfied. And you can eat as much of those as you like — it’s not about feeling hungry.

Paleo-Salad

Most people may be wondering at this stage — can I still have coffee? Yes, you can have coffee, but just substitute your regular dairy milk with almond or coconut milk.

Is Whole30 a fad diet? It’s a 30-day program and you don’t need to carry it on forever, but it’s a chance to see how your body functions without those extra items in your diet and how it works at its best. Paleo itself is not a diet, it’s a lifestyle — it’s how we used to eat before dairy and gluten were introduced into our diet. Paleo is also about promoting healthy exercise, the importance of rest and play, and the need to have nourishing relationships in your life. It’s not just restricted to the food you eat, but that’s where it all starts.

What would you say to those considering Whole30? Just give it a go and see how you feel. We have tried to make the whole process as easy as possible for you, to help you succeed and to take the guess work out of it all. Plus you won’t be the only one going through the program — there will be others taking the challenge at the same time to keep you inspired, and we [at Paleo] are here as a constant stream of information and support to guide you through any questions or concerns you may have. We are doing this as a community with the hope of improving the health and wellness of Townsville as a whole.

Paleo-Tara-Caetano

Whole30 starts on Tuesday, August 5. Contact Tara at Paleo Cafe to register your interest and for more information on 4771 4045. Read up on the rules: www.whole30.com.

Follow the progress of House Rules’ Maddi and Lloyd on their Whole30 adventure: facebook.com/paleocafetsvcity

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Carly Lubicz

Carly Lubicz

Carly Lubicz is combining two of her great loves — writing and getting active. Previously working as a journalist, sub-editor, and editor in newspapers and magazines; she is editor and co-founder of TheGo Townsville. She stays active with the staples of road cycling and yoga, but has recently discovered triathlon. And become addicted (apart from the swimming part). She also has a Cert III in Fitness and is passionate about improving mental health through physical activity.

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